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December 17, 2007

Comments

Chabelita

a0While I agree Tip #2 yields great cutsemor service, I think it might be important to keep in mind not all cutsemors will be trusting with their homes and personal space (my mom, for example, would be hesitant to let someone unfamiliar to her into her home without my dad having been home just in case). In addition, house calls take up time and money and in a tech support situationsa0efficiencya0is everything. I work for LogMeIn, and our product LogMeIn Free comes to mind as a great solution for your regular clients. Once it's installed, you can work on an ad-hoc basis and for emergency situations without leaving your house, dorm, etc. Imagine how impressed they'll be when you can do it from the mall or back of the classroom using your iPhone or Droid. There are a few options out there, so feel free to poke around.. but the LogMeIn version is always free.Kevin Aries Marketing/Communications LogMeIn @LogMeIn on Twitter

Guada

I am not sure I would like a pay cut, but I would not bother the porwes that be for a raise, anytime soon to be able to always work from home. I say this because:1) I barely make a decent wage and2) I already work from home whenever I can. I log in to my personal home computer from my work computer using LogMeIn but I have a dedicated VPN connection from my personal home computer to my work computer. This started so that I could do *some* work from home and keep an eye on any urgent customer requests during my waking hours (no, I am not part owner of the company I work for during the day just ridiculously over-dedicated to a start-up company that is barely into its second year.) Now, being able to work from home, when I work full-time in the office is both a blessing and a curse. I can keep from getting too far behind by finishing things at home. And, when we had three snow-days here (London, ON Canada) I was able to not miss a day by working strictly from home. On the other hand, while my colleagues got caught up on day-time television, I was working from home. I find that I get a lot more work completed when working from the comfort of my sofa, with my fuzzy slippers on, and my legs stretched out in reclining bliss. But, in reality, this could be because I do not have a steady stream of people coming into my office with could you just do this one thing for me, real quick ! From home, my assistant, colleagues, and bosses can still get a hold of me through Join.Me, MSN, email, and telephone (and they do). However, because I am not *physically* in the office these same people think twice about contacting me (and the rest of the staff do not come in to chit-chat.)I came in to the office today (so they don't forget who I am) and there were so many interruptions that it took me half an hour to write a two sentence email. I am writing this comment during my lunch hour and I have had no less than 6 people come in to ask me questions, give suggestions, or drop off more work.Microsoft OneNote is fabulous for a dynamic to-do list. While working from home, my list was actually shrinking. I have been back one day and the list has doubled in size. I have not even had time for a Join.Me coffee break! (pout)What was the question? Oh yes, would I consider a pay cut for the flexibility to work from home? The answer is a definite maybe ! LOL. Benefits:- Lower cost in clothing / cosmetics (no need to get fancy to stay home)- No transportation costs (gas, wear and tear on vehicle) and lower vehicle insurance- Less interruptions, more work completedNegatives:- No or little social interaction- Need to be disciplined (no turning on TV, playing hours of online games, and cleaning behind the fridge to avoid work)- People forget to keep you in the loop if you are never in.

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